Tag Archives: File a tax return

Medicare B Premiums for 2022

The base Medicare Part B monthly premium for 2022 increases to $170.10/month (from $148.50/month for 2021).

The higher premiums some taxpayers have to pay for 2022 vary depending on the taxpayers’ modified AGI (MAGI) as shown on their 2020 income tax returns. The various MAGI levels increased a small amount with the exception of the maximum MAGI levels which stayed the same (except for MFS where the maximum MAGI level actually went down). The exact costs and modified AGI levels can be found at medicare.gov by clicking on the “Your Medicare Costs” tab and then on “Part B Costs”. The top of the page shows the premiums for 2021 and the bottom of the page shows the premiums for 2022.

The highest Medicare Part B premium for 2022 is $578.30/month (up from $504.90/month for 2021) and applies to:

– Individuals with modified AGI of $500,000 or more.

– Married Filing Jointly taxpayers with modified AGI of $750,000 or more.

– Married Filing Separately taxpayers with modified AGI of $409,000 or more ($412,000 for 2021).

Year End Business Update

With year-end approaching, it is time to think about moves that may help lower your business’s taxes for 2021 and 2022.

2021 is more challenging than usual due to the uncertainty surrounding pending legislation that could increase corporate tax rates plus the top rates on both business owners’ ordinary income and capital gain starting in 2022.

Whether or not tax increases become effective next year, the standard year-end approach of deferring income and accelerating deductions to minimize taxes will continue to produce the best results for most small businesses, as will the bunching of deductible expenses into this year or next to maximize their tax value. If proposed tax increases do pass, however, the highest income businesses and owners may find that the opposite strategies produce better results: Pulling income into 2021 to be taxed at currently lower rates, and deferring deductible expenses until 2022, when they can be taken to offset what would be higher-taxed income. This will require careful evaluation of all relevant factors.

We have compiled a list of actions based on current tax rules that may help you save tax dollars if you act before year-end. Not all of them will apply to you or your business, but you may benefit from many of them. We can determine specific actions when we meet to tailor a particular plan for your business, In the meantime, please review the following list and contact us at your earliest convenience so that we can advise you on which tax-saving moves might be beneficial:

  • Taxpayers other than corporations may be entitled to a deduction of up to 20% of their qualified business income. For 2021, if taxable income exceeds $329,800 for a married couple filing jointly, about half that for others, the deduction may be limited based on whether the taxpayer is engaged in a service-type trade or business, such as law, accounting, health, or consulting, the amount of W-2 wages paid by the business, and/or the unadjusted basis of qualified property, such as machinery and equipment held by the business. The limitations are phased in; for example, the phase-in applies to joint filers with taxable income up to $100,000 above the threshold, and to other filers with taxable income up to $50,000 above their threshold.
  • Taxpayers may be able to salvage some or all of this deduction, by deferring income or accelerating deductions to keep income under the dollar thresholds, or be subject to a smaller deduction phaseout, for 2021. Depending on their business model, taxpayers also may be able increase the deduction by increasing W-2 wages before year-end. The rules are quite complex.
  • More small businesses are able to use the cash method of accounting rather than the accrual method than were allowed to do so in earlier years. To qualify as a small business a taxpayer must, among other things, satisfy a gross receipts test, which is satisfied for 2021 if, during a three-year testing period, average annual gross receipts don’t exceed $26 million. Next year this dollar amount is estimated to increase to $27 million. Not that many years ago it was $1 million. Cash method taxpayers may find it   easier to shift income, for example, by holding off billings till next year or by accelerating expenses, for example, paying bills early or by making certain prepayments. • Businesses should consider making expenditures that qualify for the liberalized business property expensing option. For tax years beginning in 2021, the expensing limit is $1,050,000, and the investment ceiling limit is $2,620,000. Expensing is generally available for most depreciable property. other than buildings, and off-the-shelf computer software. It is also available for interior improvements to a building. but not for its enlargement, elevators or escalators, or the internal structural framework, for roofs, and for HVAC, fire protection, alarm, and security systems.

The generous dollar ceilings mean that many small and medium sized businesses that make timely purchases will be able to currently deduct most if not all their outlays for machinery and equipment. What’s more, the expensing deduction is not prorated for the time that the asset is in service during the year.  Expensing eligible items acquired and placed in service in the last days of 2021, rather than at the beginning of 2022, can result in a full expensing deduction for 2021.

  • Businesses also can claim a 100% bonus first year depreciation deduction for machinery and equipment bought used, with some exceptions, or new if purchased and placed in service this year, and for qualified improvement property, described above as related to the expensing deduction. The 100% write-off is permitted without any proration based on the length of time that an asset is in service during the tax year. As a result, the 100% bonus first-year write-off is available even if qualifying assets are in service for only a few days in 2021.
  • Businesses may be able to take advantage of the de minimis safe harbor election, also known as the book-tax conformity election, to expense the costs of lower-cost assets and materials and supplies, assuming the costs aren’t required to be capitalized under the UNICAP rules. To qualify for the election, the cost of a unit of property cannot exceed $5,000 if the taxpayer has an applicable financial statement. If there’s no AFS, the cost of a unit of property cannot exceed $2,500. Where the UNICAP rules are not an issue, and where potentially increasing tax rates for 2022 are not a concern, consider purchasing qualifying items before the end of 2021.
  • A corporation, other than a large corporation, that anticipates a small net operating loss (NOL) for 2021 and substantial net income in 2022 may find it worthwhile to accelerate just enough of its 2022 income or to defer just enough of its 2021 deductions to create a small amount of net income for 2021. This allows the corporation to base its 2022 estimated tax installments on the relatively small amount of income shown on its 2021 return, rather than having to pay estimated taxes based on 100% of its much larger 2022 taxable income.
  • Year-end bonuses can be timed for maximum tax effect by both cash- and accrual-basis employers. Cash-basis employers deduct bonuses in the year paid, so they can time the payment for maximum tax effect. Accrual-basis employers deduct bonuses in the accrual year, when all events related to them are established with reasonable certainty. However, the bonus must be paid within 2½ months after the end of the employer’s tax year for the deduction to be allowed in the earlier accrual year. Accrual employers looking to defer deductions to a higher-taxed future year should consider changing their bonus plans before yearend to set the payment date later than the 2.5-month window or change the bonus plan’s terms to make the bonus amount not determinable at year end.
  • To reduce 2021 taxable income, consider deferring a debt-cancellation event until 2022. • Sometimes the disposition of a passive activity can be timed to make best use of its freed-up suspended losses. Where reduction of 2021 income is desired, consider disposing of a passive activity before year-end to take the suspended losses against 2021 income. If possible 2022 top rate increases are a concern, holding off on disposing of the activity until 2022 might save more in future taxes.

In our year- end planning, these are some of the steps that can be taken to save taxes.

Our firm looks forward to your call.

Summer Activity that May Affect Your Tax Return!

Things people do during the summer that might affect their tax return next year

IRS Tax Tip 2021-102, July 15, 2021

It’s summertime and for many people, summertime means change. Whether it’s a life change or a typical summer event, it could affect incomes taxes. Here are a few summertime activities and tips on how taxpayers should consider them during filing season.

Getting married

Newlyweds should report any name change to the Social Security Administration. They should also report an address change to the United States Postal Service, their employers, and the IRS. This will help make sure they receive documents and other items they will need to file their taxes.

Sending kids to summer day camp

Unlike overnight camps, the cost of summer day camp may count towards the child and dependent care credit.

Working part-time

While summertime and part-time workers may not earn enough to owe federal income tax, they should remember to file a return. They’ll need to file early next year to get a refund for taxes withheld from their checks this year.

Gig economy work

Taxpayers may earn summer income by providing on-demand work, services or goods, often through a digital platform like an app or website. Examples include ride sharing, delivery services and other activities. Those who do are encouraged to visit the Gig Economy Tax Center at IRS.gov to learn more about how participating in the sharing economy can affect their taxes.

Normally, employees receive a Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, from their employer to account for the summer’s work. They’ll use this to prepare their tax return. They should receive the W-2 by January 31 next year. Employees will get a W-2 even if they no longer work for the summertime employer.

Summertime workers can avoid higher tax bills and lost benefits if they know their correct status. Employers will determine whether the people who work for them are employees or independent contractors PDF. Independent contractors aren’t subject to withholding, making them responsible for paying their own income taxes plus Social Security and Medicare taxes.

 

Six Common Myths Regarding Income Tax

By:  Isaac M O’Bannon, Managing Editor CPA Practice Advisor

While millions of American taxpayers wait for their W-2, 1099 and other important tax documents to arrive in the mail, their thoughts turn to the often-dreaded prospect of filing their 2014 tax returns.

With all the annual changes to the tax rules and its complexity, it’s not surprising that millions of Americans hire a paid preparer. After all, asking questions or searching the Web for answers often leads to more confusion and misconceptions, because when it comes to taxes, one standard answer usually does not fit all.

The National Association of Enrolled Agents, an organization of federally licensed tax professionals, has pointed out six frequently-encountered tax myths.

Myth 1: “I’m filing an extension this year, so I don’t need to pay anything yet.”

Fact: Tax extensions only extend the time you have left to file, and do not change the date on which you have to pay taxes owed. If you owe taxes and file an extension, you still have to pay the taxes owed by April 15, regardless of the extended deadline date. Otherwise, interest and penalties begin to stack up.

Myth 2: “I had a really big loss in the stock market this year, so I won’t owe any income taxes.”

Fact: Deduction of capital losses against ordinary income is limited to $3,000 per year. Also, whether you reinvest or receive dividends, they are income and are taxed as such.

Myth 3: “They paid me in cash, so I don’t have to report it.”

Fact: If it’s income, you must report it. You must always report income, regardless of whether it’s cash, tips, bonuses or dividends.

Myth 4: “I’m too young to have to pay taxes.”

Fact: Even dependents working part-time while in high school must file a tax return if they earned more than $6,200 in 2014, if they want to receive their refund or if their unearned income is more than $1,000.  There are numerous other situations that may lead to a dependent having to file a tax return. To be safe, consider consulting a licensed tax professional.

Myth 5: “Income earned outside the U.S. is not taxable.”

Fact: The operative word is “income,” which means it’s taxable. The IRS requires taxpayers to report all earned income, even if it’s earned abroad.

Myth 6: “Tax preparers only fill out forms that you can do yourself.”

Fact: Licensed preparers know the intricate (and constantly changing) tax laws, regulations and codes, and how they can be applied for your benefit to save you money. Enrolled agents receive IRS-approved annual continuing education, ensuring that they have the most up-to-date strategies to make sure you pay only what you owe and get any refunds you are due. Enrolled agents, CPAs and tax attorneys are also the only tax professionals who can represent taxpayers before the IRS.

IRS Urges Taxpayers to Choose a Tax Preparer Wisely

More than half of taxpayers hire a professional when it’s time to file a tax return. Even if you don’t prepare your own Form 1040, you’re still legally responsible for what is on it.

A tax return preparer is trusted with your most personal information. They know about your marriage, your income, your children and your Social Security numbers – all of the sensitive details of your financial life. If you pay someone to prepare your federal income tax return, the IRS urges you to choose that person wisely. To do that, take some time to understand a few essentials.

Most tax return preparers provide outstanding service. However, each year, some taxpayers are hurt financially because they choose the wrong tax return preparer. Well-intentioned taxpayers can be misled by preparers who don’t understand taxes or who mislead people into taking credits or deductions they aren’t entitled to in order to increase their fee. Every year, these types of tax preparers face everything from penalties to even jail time for defrauding their clients.

Here are a few tips to keep in mind when choosing a tax preparer:

  • Check to be sure the preparer has an IRS Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN). Anyone with a valid 2015 PTIN is authorized to prepare federal tax returns. Tax return preparers, however, have differing levels of skills, education and expertise. An important difference in the types of practitioners is “representation rights”. You can learn more about the several different types of return preparers on IRS.gov/chooseataxpro.
  • Ask the tax preparer if they have a professional credential (enrolled agent, certified public accountant, or attorney), belong to a professional organization or attend continuing education classes. A number of tax law changes, including the Affordable Care Act provisions, can be complex. A competent tax professional needs to be up-to-date in these matters. Tax return preparers aren’t required to have a professional credential, but make sure you understand the qualifications of the preparer you select.
  • Check on the service fees upfront. Avoid preparers who base their fee on a percentage of your refund or those who say they can get larger refunds than others can.
  • Always make sure any refund due is sent to you or deposited into your bank account. Taxpayers should not deposit their refund into a preparer’s bank account.
  • Make sure your preparer offers IRS e-file and ask that your return be submitted to the IRS electronically. Any tax professional who gets paid to prepare and file more than 10 returns generally must file the returns electronically. It’s the safest and most accurate way to file a return, whether you do it alone or pay someone to prepare and file for you.
  • Make sure the preparer will be available. Make sure you’ll be able to contact the tax preparer after you file your return – even after the April 15 due date. This may be helpful in the event questions come up about your tax return.
  • Provide records and receipts. Good preparers will ask to see your records and receipts. They’ll ask you questions to determine your total income, deductions, tax credits and other items. Do not rely on a preparer who is willing to e-file your return using your last pay stub instead of your Form W-2. This is against IRS e-file rules.
  • Never sign a blank return. Don’t use a tax preparer that asks you to sign an incomplete or blank tax form.
  • Review your return before signing. Before you sign your tax return, review it and ask questions if something is not clear. Make sure you’re comfortable with the accuracy of the return before you sign it.
  • Ensure the preparer signs and includes their PTIN. Paid preparers must sign returns and include their PTIN as required by law. The preparer must also give you a copy of the return.
  • Report abusive tax preparers to the IRS. You can report abusive tax return preparers and suspected tax fraud to the IRS. Use Form 14157, Complaint: Tax Return Preparer. If you suspect a return preparer filed or changed the return without your consent, you should also file Form 14157-A, Return Preparer Fraud or Misconduct Affidavit. You can get these forms on IRS.gov.

IRS FS-2014-11, December 2014

With the complications associated with the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) it is very important for you to get assistance with filing your tax return this season.  Please give us a call with any questions concerning your return preparation.  We have PROFESSIONALS on staff that know the answers!

You May Now Need to File

With new tax laws beginning in 2014, a number of taxpayers who were not traditionally required to file a tax return may now need to do so.  Here are three new situations in 2014 that may require you to file a tax return.

  • You have no medical insurance.  Beginning in 2014, if you are not in a qualified health insurance plan you will need to file a tax return to pay the tax penalty.  As part of Obama-care, there is now a minimum penalty of $95.00 per individual ($285.00 per family) if you do not have health insurance.  The MAXIMUM penalty is 1% of your income.
  • You qualify for the new Health Insurance Premium Credit.  If you signed up for health insurance through the new health insurance exchange, you may be eligible for a reduction of your insurance premium through a tax credit.  You may have already applied the credit to recue your monthly insurance bill. In either case, if this credit applied to you, you must file a tax return.
  • Alimony or child support.  Given the increased attention in this area by the IRS, if you pay or receive alimony or child support you will want to ensure you tax return is filed to avoid an automatic mismatch with your ex-spouses tax return.

Have questions concerning this information?  Please give us a call.